Flu-Fighting Foods for a Long Winter

Flu-Fighting Foods for a Long Winter

Winter is coming...

As soon as fall arrives, you’re already anticipating that you’ll be hit with the obligatory sore throat, cough, and irritating cold that come along with it.
Try to incorporate a few of the following foods into your diet, and you can be sure that you’ll be helping your immune system to fight off any germs heading your way this cold season.

Look no further for hearty, health-boosting ingredients:

1. Citrus fruits

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Citrus fruits are great for two reasons: They are a delicious source of vitamin C and they’re also full of antioxidants. Their vitalizing smell is also sure to lighten your spirits during these dreary autumnal days. Take a look at our How To on 3 easy ways to juice a lemon to get one step closer to your power boost!

2. Almonds and nuts

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Nuts contain high levels of zinc and therefore help our cells fight off antibodies. If you’re allergic to nuts, then other foods, such as beef and oysters, are also high in zinc, so be sure to stock up!

3. Garlic

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Garlic improves the function of the cells in our immune systems, and thereby helps to minimize cold symptoms. It’s definitely good for other things aside from scaring away vampires!

4. Mushrooms

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Mushrooms stimulate the cells in our immune system, helping them to fight off bacteria and germs. Try our mushroom and cranberry tart: the combination of mushrooms and cranberries, which are also good for your immune system, will have you fighting fit in no time.

5. Fish and seaweed

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Fish and seaweed are rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats which help your immune system fight against any bugs or viruses that may be headed your way. Cashew nuts also contain high levels of these fats, so you can snack on them if you don’t happen to have any seaweed to hand.

6. Carrots

Carrots help you see in the dark, right? Another lesser-known fact about carrots is that they actively help your body fight bacteria. It’s useful to bear in mind that it’s easier for your body to absorb their beta-carotene if you consume them in small pieces, like in our hot chickpea soup.

Something to note:

If you notice that you’re developing the first signs of a cold, then you can try to put it off by using ginger, as its essential oils and invigorating properties encourage circulation, flushing antibodies out of your system. Ginger’s goodness can be found right beneath its skin, so try to only take the thinnest layer possible off when peeling it, so as not to discard the best bits. Take a look at our How To video on how to peel ginger for some tips and tricks!

Homemade ginger ale

Homemade ginger ale

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To make sure you get off to a great start this winter, then there’s no better way to use your freshly peeled ginger than in our delicious ginger ale! Enjoy!